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Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

2 edition of Szlonzoks and their language found in the catalog.

Szlonzoks and their language

Tomasz Kamusella

Szlonzoks and their language

between Germany, Poland and Szlonzokian nationalism

by Tomasz Kamusella

  • 256 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by European University Institute in Badia Fiesolana, San Domenico (FI) .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Linguistic minorities -- Silesia.,
  • Ethnic groups -- Silesia.,
  • Nationalism -- Silesia.,
  • Silesia -- Ethnology.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementTomasz Kamusella.
    SeriesEUI working paper -- no.2003/1
    ContributionsEuropean University Institute. Department of History and Civilization.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination50 p. :
    Number of Pages50
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16339822M

    Silesian or Upper Silesian (Silesian: ślōnskŏ gŏdka, ślůnsko godka, Czech: Slezština, Polish: język śląski / etnolekt śląski) is a West Slavic lect, related to Polish [citation needed] and vocabulary has been significantly influenced by Central German due to the existence of numerous Silesian German speakers in the area prior to World War II and after, until the s.   In fact, unlike the Polish-speaking workers who came into the region from Galicia, most natives spoke a local language based on Polish and German. They called themselves Szlonzoks (pron. Schlonzohks, see Kamusella book cited under the Upper Silesian Plebiscite below),but they were not recognized as a nation.

    His English-language monographs include Silesia and Central European Nationalisms: The Emergence of National and Ethnic Groups in Prussian Silesia and Austrian Silesia, (Purdue University Press ), The Politics of Language and Nationalisms in Modern Central Europe (Palgrave and ), and The Szlonzoks and Their Language.   / The Szlonzoks and Their Language: Between Germany, Poland and Szlonzakian Nationalism, Zabrze KAPAŁA Zbigniew (red.), Nie tylko o Korfantym, Bytom KAPRAS Jan, Z dějin Českeho Slezska, Opava

    The Szlonzoks and Their Language: Between Germany, Poland and Szlonzokian Nationalism. Florence, European University Institute: Working Papers Series of the Department of History and Civilization (HEC /1). Sayce, A. H. Akkadian: An elementary grammar with full syllabary and progressive reading book of the Assyrian language. London: Samuel Bagster and Sons, Swaim, Gerald Gordon.


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Szlonzoks and their language by Tomasz Kamusella Download PDF EPUB FB2

Szlonzoks and their language. San Domenico: European University Institute, (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Tomasz Kamusella; European University Institute. Department of History and Civilization.

This book analyzes the problems of nation building in the Central European region of Silesia in to The German ethnic model of nation building steeped in language and culture had been replicated in the case of Polish and Czech nationalisms.

Silesia became a focal point as an area that was sought after by all three nations. Tomasz Kamusella has worked at Opole University in Poland since His research focuses on the issues of ethnicity, nationalism, language formation, and European integration.

He has been widely published on these subjects in Europe and North America, and he recently published The Szlonzoks and Their by: 3. Fromhe augmented his research on language, politics, and nationalism in central Europe during the 19th and 20th centuries at the European University Institute, Florence and the John W.

Kluge Center at the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Recently he published The Szlonzoks and Their Language: Between Germany, Poland and. Distribution. Silesian speakers currently live in the region of Upper Silesia, which is split between southwestern Poland and the northeastern Czech present Silesian is commonly spoken in the area between the historical border of Silesia on the east and a line from Syców to Prudnik on the west as well as in the Rawicz area.

Until Silesian was also spoken in enclaves in Lower Language family: Indo-European, Balto. The Slavic Silesian language or dialect of Polish (often called Upper Silesian) is spoken by the Silesian ethnic group or nationality inside Polish Upper ing to the last census in Poland (), somepeople declared Silesian to be their native language; however, as many aspeople declared themselves to be of Silesian nationality, not necessarily speaking Silesian.

A few weeks ago I posted Silesians, linking to an article on the history and current situation of that minority and their dialect; I have just gotten an e-mail from Tomasz Kamusella, the author of the article, linking to his paper on “The Szlonzoks and their Language: Between Germany, Poland and Szlonzokian Nationalism” (pdf, accessible from this page) and his “small book on the.

The book brings together renowned international scholars who offer a variety of perspectives from a number of disciplines and sub-fields such as sociolinguistics, socio-political history and language policy, making this book of great interest to historians, sociologists, political scientists and anthropologists interested in Central and Eastern.

Silesia and Central European Nationalism by Tomasz Kamusella,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(3).

‘A magisterial overview of forced population movements across all of Eastern Europe at the end of the Second World War and in its aftermath. Service’s monograph thus serves as a highly useful introduction to the phenomenon for non-specialist historians and social scientists with limited familiarity with the phenomenon, even as the detailed case studies are essential reading for researchers.

Szlonzoks, Slunzaks, and Morawecs do not come through very vividly in this book. This is due, to a considerable extent, to misplaced narrative priorities. Substantial sections of the book are devoted to general background on the rise of German, Polish, and Czech nationalism in the nineteenth century, information that the author has drawn.

What went unnoticed until very recently is the fact that most Szlonzoks, or born and bred Silesians with their own language, would have preferred a "Free State of Upper Silesia." About half a million of them favored this solution out of a total population of some two million people (only men had the vote).

michael mills wrote:I note that the Australian national University library has a copy of another work by Kamusella, with the title "The Szlonzoks and Their Language: Between Germany, Poland and Szlonzokian Nationalism". I will retrieve it and see what it says; it could be interesting. Polish-language Katolik—are implausibly described as having “fortified the ethnic identity of the Szlonzoks” (–57, ).

Kamusella’s brief discussion of the League of Upper Silesians, a group advocating regional independence that emerged following the First World War, also tends toward uncritical enthusiasm. High-end estimates of. For more on the interwar Upper Silesian independence movement, see Doose, Günther, Die separatistische Bewegung in Oberschlesien nach dem Ersten Weltkrieg, – (Wiesbaden: Otto Harrassowitz, ); and Kamusella, Tomasz, The Szlonzoks and their Language: Between Germany, Poland, and Szlonzokian Nationalism (San Domenico: European Cited by: 6.

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this. The Book of Henryków () is the earliest document to include a sentence written in the Silesian language, although the sentence has also been recognised as being in ether Polish or Czech.

[41] The Book of Henrykow itself calls it "Polish" (" Hoc est in polonico "). His English-language monographs include Silesia and Central European Nationalisms: The Emergence of National and Ethnic Groups in Prussian Silesia and Austrian Silesia, (Purdue University Press ), The Politics of Language and Nationalisms in Modern Central Europe (Palgrave and ), and The Szlonzoks and Their Language.

Tomasz Kamusella: The Szlonzokian Ethnolect in the Context of German and Polish Nationalisms Madajczyk, P. Przylaczenie Slaska Opolskiego do Polski Jan and Ideas” The Polish Review 57 (), The Szlonzoks and Their Language: Between Germany, Poland and Szlonzokian Nationalism (), and the co-edited volume Na-tionalisms Today () that inaugurated the book series Nationalisms Across the Globe (Peter Lang).

DARIUSZ KOŁODZIEJCZYK is a professor of early modern history at the Univer. The Szlonzoks and Their Language: Between Germany, Poland and Szlonzokian Nationalism.

Florence, European University Institute: Working Papers Series of the Department of History and Civilization (HEC /1), 50 pp. The Dynamics of the Policies of Ethnic Cleansing in Silesia During the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (research work).The Szlonzoks and Their Language: Between Germany, Poland and Szlonzokian Nation-alism (), and the co-edited volume Nationalisms Today () that inaugurated the book series Nationalisms Across the Globe (Peter Lang).

ZHANAT KUNDAKBAYEVA, professor at the al-Farabi Kazakh National Univer-sity, specializes in the history of imperial Size: KB.Húsek, Jan. Hranice mezi zemí moravsko-slezskou a Slovenskem [The Borderline between the Moravian-Silesian Land and Slovakia {in Czech}].

Praha: Orbis. Chloupek, Jan et al. K diferenciaci moravskoslovenských nárečí a jejich vztahu k českému národnímu jazyku [Differentiation of Moravian Slovak Dialects and Their Relationship to the Czech National Language {in Czech}] (pp Cited by: 1.